posix issue

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tikbalang
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posix issue

Post#1 by tikbalang » 24 May 2011, 06:42

i have porteus frugal installed on my usb and hdd, both on fat32 partition. i am worried about the posix overlay on fat32. it writes way too many files that it slows down booting and simple file/disk access. this is detrimental to flashdisks. i solved it by using a 128mb slaxsave.dat file. is it possible to do away with the .dat file? slax didn't need it.


here is my menu.lst for grub4dos:

Code: Select all


title Porteus KDE
find --set-root --ignore-floppies /porteus/porteus.lst
kernel /porteus/boot/vmlinuz vga=791 changes=/porteus/slaxsave.dat autoexec=xconf;telinit~4
initrd /porteus/boot/initrd.lz

title Porteus LXDE
find --set-root --ignore-floppies /porteus/porteus.lst
kernel /porteus/boot/vmlinuz vga=791 changes=/porteus/slaxsave.dat autoexec=lxde;xconf;telinit~4
initrd /porteus/boot/initrd.lz


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ponce
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Re: posix issue

Post#2 by ponce » 24 May 2011, 06:53

I'll quote from here
fanthom wrote:- due to bugs in latest kernel/aufs I have removed possibility of saving changes on FAT/NTFS completely. During boot time you will be asked for creation of save.dat container which should be used for storing of changes. if you refuse do it - 'always fresh' mode will be forced by linuxrc at every boot.
BTW - even if aufs will be fixed in the future, i'm not going to bring back 'FAT/NTFS changes' functionality. issues caused by posixovl should be over now.
the .dat file is the reccomended way to manage changes if you're using those kind of filesystems.

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brokenman
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Re: posix issue

Post#3 by brokenman » 24 May 2011, 13:25

this is detrimental to flashdisks. i solved it by using a 128mb slaxsave.dat file. is it possible to do away with the .dat file? slax didn't need it.
The harm to flash disks is VERY minimal. i have had a single flash disk for over 6 years of use and have not yet maxed out it read/write limits.
i am worried about the posix overlay on fat32. it writes way too many files
I don't understand. You don't want posix AND you want to do away with the .dat file? How will things work then? (just use a linux partition) v.10 Porteus has done away with posix and in it's place it will automatically create a .dat file if it senses a fat32 partition. Slax most certainly DID need a .dat file, it was invented because of the inherent corruption potential of the posixvol. Check the forums there and you will see the hundreds of complaints about file system corruption and the ways to prevent it.

Remember, all users here came from the slax forums and are well versed in it's functions. You can download the latest rc release of Porteus on the same server as v09, but in the 'testing' folder. Try it out, there are many improvements.
How do i become super user?
Wear your underpants on the outside and put on a cape.

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Ahau
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Re: posix issue

Post#4 by Ahau » 24 May 2011, 14:29

Yeah, posixovl is not the way to go for long-term use of many files (i.e. changes). You used it without knowing it was there in slax (but I'll bet it got corrupted more than once).

You might consider using a larger .dat container, I bet you fill up 128MB pretty quickly. In V1.0, you can create a custom sized and named container (maybe let us know why you don't like the .dat container, and we can help).

If you want to get away from posixovl (which you'll have to do if you upgrade to V1.0), and you don't want to do a .dat container, I have two more options for you:

1) Create a linux (ext2 or ext3) partition on one of your drives, and point your changes= to that (e.g. changes=/dev/sdb2/porteuschanges/). Posixovl is not needed because linux file systems can handle linux permissions and symlinks.

2) Run in Always Fresh mode. You can customize your system and make a module out of your configurations so they will survive reboot. I almost never save my changes, except when I'm testing saved changes.
Please take a look at our online documentation, here. Suggestions are welcome!

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