Using rootcopy folder

Post here if you are a new Porteus member and you're looking for some help.
Post Reply
panacoic
Ronin
Ronin
Posts: 3
Joined: 26 Feb 2012, 15:57
Location: Hungary

Using rootcopy folder

Post#1 by panacoic » 03 Mar 2012, 21:16

I have read about rootcopy folder.

Still, I have a problem, can I use it, also in "always fresh" mode, for adding permanent modules to the system? Or it's only for scripts or whatever?!

I'm curious, because I had problems converting and activating modules in v1.0, so I could go the other way around with rootcopy, it would a giant step. :D

WHat can you say about that?!

THanks in advance!

User avatar
Hamza
Warlord
Warlord
Posts: 1847
Joined: 28 Dec 2010, 07:41
Distribution: Porteus
Location: France

Re: Using rootcopy folder

Post#2 by Hamza » 03 Mar 2012, 23:31

Welcome on board :)

Please explain your problem with more details and we'll be able to understand better what's the issue.
NjVFQzY2Rg==

User avatar
wread
Module Guard
Module Guard
Posts: 1116
Joined: 09 Jan 2011, 18:48
Distribution: Porteus v3.2.5-kde5-64 bits
Location: Santo Domingo
Contact:

Re: Using rootcopy folder

Post#3 by wread » 03 Mar 2012, 23:56

@panacoic

Of course you can use "Always Fresh" mode and use rootcopy to put your favorite files in the system.
But the best solution of your problem will be to tell the community its nature. Most problems have been solved, as yet.

Cheers!
Porteus is proud of the FASTEST KDE ever made.....(take akonadi, nepomuk and soprano out and you will have a decent OS).
The Porteus Community never sleeps!

User avatar
Ahau
King of Docs
King of Docs
Posts: 1331
Joined: 28 Dec 2010, 15:18
Distribution: LXDE & Xfce 32/64-bit
Location: USA

Re: Using rootcopy folder

Post#4 by Ahau » 04 Mar 2012, 06:47

Hello and welcome, panacoic!

The intent of rootcopy is for it to hold things like scripts and config files, because it's easier to add and remove them, modify them, etc than to extract and compress modules for minor modifications. That said, I don't know that there's a theoretical limit on how much you can place into it (there are realistic limits, based on your hardware, of course). You could, for example, extract a module and place it's contents in rootcopy and have the contents available in your live filesystem. However, rootcopy is not as efficient as keeping those files in a module. In a module, the files are compressed, so they occupy less space, and the modules are mounted, whereas the files in rootcopy are actually copied from the rootcopy directory into your live filesystem (using up more of your RAM). So, if you add a ton of files, your boot time will get slowed down a bit and your system will run a little slower. Also, if you're running porteus off of a FAT filesystem, it won't support file permissions (which could cause security issues) or symlinks (which could break things).

If you have modules that you want activated every time you boot up, then place them in /porteus/modules/ on your storage device, and you'll be set.

Rootcopy does work in "Always Fresh" mode -- this is how I run my system (no 'saved changes', but when I want to specifically modify something, I make the change and stick it in rootcopy). This will change a bit in the next release candidate for version 1.2 -- the 'Always Fresh' menu item will ignore magic folders, rootcopy, and all modules except the ones from the default ISO (making it more of a 'disaster recovery' mode). You'll still be able to boot without changes with rootcopy and extra modules, however, simply by removing the 'changes=' cheatcode from the typical KDE or lxde boot entry.

Good luck, and let us know if any more questions pop up :)
Please take a look at our online documentation, here. Suggestions are welcome!

User avatar
brokenman
Site Admin
Site Admin
Posts: 5657
Joined: 27 Dec 2010, 03:50
Distribution: Porteus v3.2rcX all desktops
Location: Brazil
Contact:

Re: Using rootcopy folder

Post#5 by brokenman » 04 Mar 2012, 13:55

I will just add that 'rootcopy' files are the last to be copied into the live file system.

This means if you have a file in a module (e.g /etc/rc.d/rc.local) and you have the same file in rootcopy. The file in rootcopy will 'overwrite' the one in the modules. This can be important if you forget that you left something in rootcopy.
How do i become super user?
Wear your underpants on the outside and put on a cape.

panacoic
Ronin
Ronin
Posts: 3
Joined: 26 Feb 2012, 15:57
Location: Hungary

Re: Using rootcopy folder

Post#6 by panacoic » 05 Mar 2012, 18:47

Hello everyone!

Please forgive me in every way. I have forgotten to mention a lot of things, regarding /rootcopy folder.
First of all, Ahau thank you for the thorough description. I was trying to save modules and stuff from the vicious 'Always Fresh' mode. :D
Conclusion: rootcopy is not recommended for modules, cause it's time and memory consuming. :pardon:

Thank you hamza, wread, brokenman, Ahau for the warm welcome.

Post Reply